Picture Packets - Vowels

The Picture Packets-Vowels are the next step in transitioning the child from reading with sounds to reading with letters.  At the Picture Packets-Transition level, all the sounds that make up a word are shown above the word they represent.  At the Vowels level, generally only the vowel sounds are included as hints for the letters.

The child begins Picture Packets-Vowels after he or she can read the Picture Packet-Transition phrases with ease.

Beneath the vowels-only words are loops and/or lines with arrows.  The meanings of these markings are fairly straight-forward.

Loops are placed under letters that are to be read together and not as separate sounds.  For example, the “sh” or “th” letters in a word have a loop beneath them so the child knows to treat the letters together as one sound and not as “s” and “h” or “t” and “h” separately.

The horizontal lines with two perpendicular arrows indicate that both of the letters the arrows point to are used to spell that particular sound.  These same lines with arrows are familiar to the child from the Decoding Chart.

The word “sew” appears with a solid black line beneath it.  The solid black line is used to indicate outlaw words.  Click on the Outlaw Words button in the menu bar above for an explanation of Outlaw Words.