Writing Worksheets

The Writing Worksheets are only introduced to the child when he or she is comfortable and confident reading and writing with the sounds.  This confidence is measured by how easily the child reads the phrases at the phrase levels of the Reading Worksheets and Picture Packets-Phrases, and by the quality of the stories the child stamps out.  Quality in this case means how well the sounds in words are heard, and not is the child a budding Shakespeare.

No child should be rushed into the transition level.  Learning takes time.  When there is time, it takes place.

The Writing Worksheets in combination with the Decoding Chart transition the child from reading with sounds to reading with letters.

Use of the Worksheets and the Decoding Chart is learned by the parent first, who then teaches the child.

Four Lessons for the Parent

Lesson Number One
Display page one (1 one) of the two-sound triangle on your iPad.
Use a downloaded copy of the Decoding Chart or the Chart-Level App.
Look at the first word on the page and its codings.
The first sound has a yellow rectangle beneath it.
Look for the on the Decoding Chart.
What letters are in the yellow space directly beneath the on the Chart?
Use your finger to write these letters beneath the first sound on the page.
If you make a mistake, there is an eraser button at the end of each row.

Now, look at the second sound in the word.
This sound has no rectangle beneath it.
No rectangle means it uses the white spelling for the sound.
No rectangle is needed since the worksheet is already white.
Look for theon the Decoding Chart.
What letter is in the white space directly beneath theon the Chart?
Use your finger to write this letter beneath the second sound in the word.
If lesson one’s instructions have been clear, you have written:

Lesson Number Two
Display page three (3 three) of the three sound-triangle.
Look at the second word on the page and its codings.
The first sound has no rectangle beneath it.
No rectangle means it uses the white spelling for the sound.
Look for the on the Decoding Chart.
What letter is in the white space directly beneath the on the Chart?
Use your finger to write this letter beneath the first sound for the word.

Now, look at the second sound in the word.
The sound has a yellow rectangle beneath it.
There are two letter in the yellow space directly beneath the on the Chart. Unlike the blue spelling for this same sound, these two letters have a space between them. The space means another letter is to be written between these two letters. So write the first letter, leave a space, and write the second letter. Or, if you prefer, wait a bit and see what the in between letter is to be.

Now, look at the third sound in the word.
This sound has no rectangle beneath it.
No rectangle means it uses the white spelling for the sound.
Look for theon the Decoding Chart.
What letter is in the white space directly beneath theon the Chart?
Use your finger to write this letter beneath the third sound in the word. The two letters from the second sound go on either side.
If lesson two’s instructions have been clear so far, you have written:

Lesson Number Three
You have now used a Decoding Chart to translate words written with sounds to words written with letters.  That is almost all there is to it.  Before you become a Decoding Chart expert, however, there are two other decoding rules you need to know.

Display page one (1 one) of the two-sound triangle.
Look at the second word on the worksheet.
The sound has no rectangle beneath it, which means it uses the white spelling for the sound.
Look on the Decoding Chart for the white spelling of .
Use your finger to write this letter beneath the sound.

Now, look at the second sound in the word.
This sound has no color coding beneath it, so the white spelling rule applies.
What is the white spelling for?  Do not write it just yet.
The two black stars that appear beneath the indicate that the spelling is to be written twice. So, the white spelling beneath is to be written twice.
Use your finger to write the spelling twice beneath the second sound in the word.
If lesson three's instructions have been clear, you have written:

You now know three of the rules for using the Decoding Chart.  There is only one more rule to learn.

The Color and Number Codings
First, though, an explanation of the little numbers inside the Decoding Chart’s rectangles.  The yellow rectangles have a 2 in them, red rectangles a 3, blue rectangles a 4, and so on.  There is no 1 coding inside the white rectangles.  Just as a sound with no rectangle placed beneath it is assumed to use the white spelling, a sound without a number underneath is assumed to use the first spelling.

Color codings are introduced as children first begin writing letters for the sounds.  Colors are easier for children to use at the start when figuring which letters to copy from the Chart.  Colors draw the child's attention immediately to the correct spelling to be used.

As the child becomes increasingly familiar with his or her Decoding Chart, number references are introduced.  When the child begins the Sightword worksheets, number references alone are employed.

Colors are easy, but numbers have an advantage, too.  If a parent wishes to print out something from the Stamping App for a child to translate into letters, the parent can add the required sound letter codings more easily with numbers than with colors.  Writing a 2 or a 3 requires only a pencil or a pen.  Drawing colored rectangle requires a box of crayons.  Numbers are included as a part of each coding from the outset to make the transition from colors to numbers a smooth and natural one.

Lesson Number Four - The Silent Letter Stamp
Display page one (1 one) of the two-sound square.
Look at the first word on the page and its codings.
Neither the nor the have any colored rectangles beneath them.
So, we already know to use the white, spelling for each of these sounds.

Sound images are a highly effective method of allowing children to learn to read and to write because they reduce the complexity of the task into manageable units.  Traditional methods can overwhelm the child from the very beginning with too much that is confusing.  However, once the child has achieved a high level of security and confidence in his or her ability to read and write with sounds, the complexities are gradually introduced.

One of the confusing aspects of written words is that the letters in some words do not make any sound at all.  The 'L' in the word “walk” does not stand for a sound.  The word could just as well be spelled “wawk” but we are too used to the silent 'L' to do without it now.

As children begin the transition from reading with sounds to reading with letters, they also begin learning about the silent letters tucked away in some words.  When a silent letter occurs in a word, the Decoding Chart lets the child know which letter to write.

Look again at the first word on the page.
The at the end of the word is a space holder used to indicate the presence of a soundless-letter.

The letters of the alphabet are in one long row at the bottom of Decoding Chart, with an identifying symbol is printed above each one.  For easier location, the symbols are enclosed in colored squares.

Now, let's finish writing the word in the example above.

The symbol below the silent letter stamp is enclosed in a small yellow square.
Find the symbol on the bottom of your Decoding Chart.
What letter is the symbol meant to represent?
Use your finger to write this letter beneath sound on the worksheet.
If these instructions have been clear, you have written:

Try a few more pages on your own.

When you feel comfortable using the Decoding Chart to convert sounds into letters, you are ready to teach your child to use the Writing Worksheets and the Decoding Chart to begin transition from reading with sounds to reading with letters.

For parents who wish to use the Stamping App to write out stories for their children to translate into letter, or modify stories already written by the child, the silent letter stamp is available for parental use in the bottom right-hand row.